In order to account for the low CBD content of these hemp plants, manufacturers have to process large volumes of raw material at a time, with the idea of extracting just enough CBD so that they can label their product as a “CBD oil.” While this method is fine in theory, what ultimately ends up happening (unless the manufacturer’s extraction methods are state of the art), is that traces of chemicals cane end up being left over in the final product. These chemicals can potentially contain harsh solvents such as butane, hexane, and propylene glycol, which has been known to break down into carcinogenic (cancer-causing) compounds like formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.
Correct Answer: Yes, this is the only way to ensure top to bottom quality, consistency, and safety. All hemp should be organically grown on-site and final the extracted products should be produced in-house with sustainable practices. This is important because it gives the company full control over all the inputs in their tinctures, salves, and other products.
Full spectrum CBD does, however, bring with it the sticky issue of THC. The government regulates concentration levels of THC at 0.3 percent, an amount which results in minimal psychoactivity. But THC metabolites are stored in the fat cells of your body, building up over time. If you ever need to take a drug test, this could create an issue for you.
Cannabidiol (CBD) oil has become increasingly popular as a natural way to help people try to manage pain, reduce inflammation, and cope with anxiety.* Though the number of prescriptions has risen sharply in the United States over the past 20 years, many Americans are trying to limit the number of prescribed drugs they take – instead, searching for all-natural solutions to the aches, pains, and discomfort they begin to face as they age. For many of them, CBD oil is the solution they’ve been looking for. But not all CBD oil is created equal, meaning finding the right CBD oil could just be the most important part of their journey.
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