There’s also been a lot of talk lately about “microdosing” CBD. This refers to an incremental process of finding your minimum effective dose. You can do this with any concentration of CBD oil, but lower concentrations will take longer. In a 2017 article in Rolling Stone, Dr. Dustan Sulak outlines his protocol for microdosing. You can begin this process by asking yourself three questions:
CBD and cannabis have been studied in other specific cancers. A 2013 study published in the journal Chemotherapy studied the effects of synthetic THC against gastric cancer grafts in rodents. Rodents treated with the THC saw a 30 percent reduction in tumor growth over 14 days of treatment when compared to the control. A 2012 Journal of Molecular Medicine study found tumors in mice with laboratory-induced colon cancer shrunk with CBD treatment. A 2013 study published in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics found that CBD triggers cell death in certain lung cancer cell lines, decreasing tumor viability.
The manufacturer will probably give you a recommended dosage, but bear in mind that this isn’t set in stone. What you need to find is your own minimum effective dose. “Minimum effective dose” is a medical term which refers to the amount of a substance you need for the results you want, and above which, the substance doesn’t increase in effectiveness.
Today, companies are extremely skillful at creating a “wow” looking product that will blow your mind. But before you rush out and purchase your first CBD oil on sale, check the seller’s website for their lab tests. Reputable companies use third-party labs to test their products, and have no problem sharing the results. This shows a lot about a company — if they are willing to share their results, then they truly believe in their product and are not hiding anything.
There are over 85 cannabinoids that make up the marijuana plant. The most popular and well known of these is tetrahydrocannabinol, or better known as THC. THC is a psychotropic cannabinoid that causes a high when inhaled or ingested. CBD has no THC. This means those dealing with various forms of pain and depression can safely use CBD to curb negative effects on the body without having to turn to prescription pharmaceuticals.
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Cannabidiol (CBD) oil has become increasingly popular as a natural way to help people try to manage pain, reduce inflammation, and cope with anxiety.* Though the number of prescriptions has risen sharply in the United States over the past 20 years, many Americans are trying to limit the number of prescribed drugs they take – instead, searching for all-natural solutions to the aches, pains, and discomfort they begin to face as they age. For many of them, CBD oil is the solution they’ve been looking for. But not all CBD oil is created equal, meaning finding the right CBD oil could just be the most important part of their journey.
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