In the U.S., we live in a culture where more is often perceived as being better.  And it’s easy, without even thinking about it, to apply that approach to CBD dosing. But when it comes to CBD, more is not necessarily better. In fact, for many, less CBD is more effective. One way to determine your optimal dosage is to start with a small amount of CBD for a couple weeks and then slowly increase your dosage, carefully taking note of symptoms, until you’re seeing the results you want.
Industrial hemp has low THC levels compared to marijuana specifically cultivated for personal psychoactive use. Whereas marijuana that can be smoked usually contains between five and ten percent THC, industrial hemp contains about one-tenth of that. In order to get a psychoactive effect, one would need to smoke ten or twelve hemp cigarettes over a very short period of time.
When you are purchasing CBD Oil Products, you have two options: Full Spectrum CBD or Isolated (regular) CBD. Full Spectrum CBD, as Hemp Oil, contains every Cannabinoid present in the Hemp (Cannabis Sativa) plant. This means Cannabidiol, Cannabicyclol, Tetrahyrdocannabivarin, and Cannbichromevinaric acid, to name a few. In Full Spectrum CBD Oil, there is nothing held back or left out. On the other side CBD Isolate contains pure CBD compound, which has a more flexible legal status as well no taste, color or strong odor as Full Spectrum CBD Oil.
Tinctures are ideal for CBD novices, as they’re not always as strong as other CBD product types. If you know how much CBD you require and you’re after a higher concentration, a regular CBD tincture is unlikely to deliver the goods. However, this is beginning to change as companies experiment with higher concentrations. In the meantime, consider a vape oil, paste, or concentrate to enjoy a stronger CBD experience.
In order to account for the low CBD content of these hemp plants, manufacturers have to process large volumes of raw material at a time, with the idea of extracting just enough CBD so that they can label their product as a “CBD oil.” While this method is fine in theory, what ultimately ends up happening (unless the manufacturer’s extraction methods are state of the art), is that traces of chemicals cane end up being left over in the final product. These chemicals can potentially contain harsh solvents such as butane, hexane, and propylene glycol, which has been known to break down into carcinogenic (cancer-causing) compounds like formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

Edibles begin with a raw or decarb oil as part of the base ingredients. They can be any number of things, from chocolate to hard candy, gummies, even teas and coffee. This is a way to “sneak” cannabinoids in a fun way and can be delicious (the Koi gummies are so good!) but they are not an extremely cost-effective way to allow cannabinoids to boost your overall health and well being on a daily basis.
For those needing a refresh, CBD or cannabidiol is one of the many compounds, or cannabinoids, found both in cannabis sativa (federally illegal) and industrial hemp (gray area) that has shown preclinical promise in treating anxiety and inflammation. Adding to its therapeutic legitimacy, CBD was recently FDA-approved to be used in an epilepsy drug called Epidiolex making it the first cannabis compound to be federally recognized. Over the last year, CBD’s become the darling of the wellness world, working its way into our juices, facials, creams, and cocktails, purportedly giving people the benefits of cannabis without the THC high. Very chill.

To get almonds from an almond tree, you can just shake the tree. To get juice from an orange, you can simply squeeze the fruit. But getting CBD oil from hemp is a much more complicated process. The cheapest and easiest ways to extract CBD oil from hemp commonly involve harsh solvents that can leave chemical residue in the CBD oil. The best, and most reliable extraction method, uses carbon dioxide (CO2) under high pressure and extremely low temperatures to pull out as much CBD as possible without introducing contaminants. Once the CO2 is no longer under intense pressure, it simply evaporates, leaving virtually no trace of extraction on the CBD oil.

Pesticides, mold, and other contaminants are obviously substances you don’t want to be mainlining into your body, but properly dosed CBD is also crucial. That’s because your body’s response to CBD dosage is bell-curved. Too little and you won’t feel anything; too much and it’ll dampen the impact with reported side effects like lethargy and diarrhea (not chill). Given the lack of research into dosage and the variety of ailments CBD is used for, most people have to find their own “Goldilocks Zone.”
It’s not difficult to find someone who has been impacted by cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute in 2016, an estimated 1,685,210 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States and 595,690 people will die from the disease. In addition, the number of people living beyond a cancer diagnosis reached nearly 14.5 million in 2014 and is expected to rise to almost 19 million by 2024. Newly approved cancer drugs cost an average of $10,000 per month, with some therapies topping $30,000 per month. This doesn’t include the cost of chemotherapy, provider fees, or lost income. These staggering statistics provide a bleak outlook for cancer patients. What if there was a better way to help patients? Could CBD provide any benefits? Let’s look deeper.

Hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it is capable of absorbing both the good and the bad from the air, water, and soil in which it’s grown. This makes it all the more important to know that your CBD oil comes from organically grown hemp that can be tracked to its US-grown source. The last thing buyers want is for their CBD oil to have accumulated toxic substances such as pesticides, herbicides, or heavy metals. For decades, farmers have used pesticides to protect crops against insects, disease, and fungi – and have used herbicides to control weeds – but we’ve known for quite some time that chemicals used to harm other species can also be harmful to our own species. That’s one big reason behind the global push to go organic. People are starting to prioritize organic crops, whether you’re talking about fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, livestock feed – even textiles like cotton, wool, and flax.

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