While THC affects your brain’s endocannabinoid receptors (resulting in the high), CBD does not attach directly to the receptors. Instead, it influences your body into using its own natural supply of cannabinoids more effectively. That is to say, it can inhibit or activate compounds in the ECS, which in turn can impact the amount of pain you feel or limit inflammation in the brain and nervous system.
Hemp CBD is completely different from cannabis CBD. Hemp also derives from the Cannabis sativa L plant, and while it also contains THC, it contains it in volumes that are less than 0.3% by dry weight. Some governments, including the US, regulate the concentration of THC and permit a specific variety of hemp (called industrial hemp) that is bred with an especially low THC content. This is the reason why, when you type into Google “CBD oil for Sale”, you get hundreds of companies trying to sell you their products – according to most all of them, CBD oil from industrial hemp is 100% legal to sell online and ship to all 50 states.
CBD oil products are liquid drops of hemp which are taken orally. They are non-psychoactive and are available in low and high concentrations. Hemp oil tinctures are easy-to-use and offer all of the benefits associated with CBD. Hemp oil can be used sublingually via a dropper, or it can be added to your food and beverages which is why most customers have made it their go-to CBD product.
Generally, CBD oil is made by combining an extract with a carrier fluid or oil. This question is best answered by looking at how the CBD oil was extracted. CBD oil can be extracted using CO2 systems or by using chemical solvents. Both methods produce a CBD oil byproduct that is then combined with a fluid like MCT oil, coconut oil, or olive oil so that it can be delivered to the body. Always check to make sure you know the CBD content of the products you purchase.
I tried CBD oil and it was just as useful for pain as yoga. This expensive commodity is just another catch phrase replacement theology trying to be substituted for what used to be adequate pain control treatment. Today at least my Dr stands there and says sorry as he lowers the dose by another pill. Thank you for trying. Our last ditch effort on Earth will be no doubt be to smoke MJ..
In the U.S., we live in a culture where more is often perceived as being better.  And it’s easy, without even thinking about it, to apply that approach to CBD dosing. But when it comes to CBD, more is not necessarily better. In fact, for many, less CBD is more effective. One way to determine your optimal dosage is to start with a small amount of CBD for a couple weeks and then slowly increase your dosage, carefully taking note of symptoms, until you’re seeing the results you want.
We’ve systematically sought out the most beautiful and healthy hemp cultivars for our raw ingredients used in CBD oil manufacturing, and we always test for purity and potency. Hemp, because of its innate ability to thrive easily, doesn’t require pesticides (the aromatic terpene compounds in hemp can actually act as natural pesticides), fertilizers, or herbicides in its cultivation, and requires much less water than standard commercial farming. The hemp we use is grown under the same methods and standards of organic farming.

Hemp is a bioaccumulator, meaning it is capable of absorbing both the good and the bad from the air, water, and soil in which it’s grown. This makes it all the more important to know that your CBD oil comes from organically grown hemp that can be tracked to its US-grown source. The last thing buyers want is for their CBD oil to have accumulated toxic substances such as pesticides, herbicides, or heavy metals. For decades, farmers have used pesticides to protect crops against insects, disease, and fungi – and have used herbicides to control weeds – but we’ve known for quite some time that chemicals used to harm other species can also be harmful to our own species. That’s one big reason behind the global push to go organic. People are starting to prioritize organic crops, whether you’re talking about fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, livestock feed – even textiles like cotton, wool, and flax.
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